Is this year going to be your best year?

Well, here it is, the end of January, and many of you responded to my posts on New Year’s Resolutions.

We discussed the importance of remembering that a New year’s resolution is just something that you resolve to do within a year.

So hopefully, you are still hanging in there with your goal.

But now, today, I want to talk about something bigger and deeper.

Deeper than meeting several goals.

And more profound then establishing a couple good habits.

Today, I would like to get your focus on to making this your best year ever.

Reader, what would it take to make this your best year ever?

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“The Slacker”|Personality Thursday

 

'It's almost five o'clock. Barstow should start showing some initiative any moment now.'

Hi all. It’s personality Thursday and again, and today, I’d like to talk about “The Slacker”.

I can’t really call the Slacker a specific personality type, because so many different types and sub-types can exhibit this behavior.

In fact, even type A, “driven” personalities are subject to procrastination from time to time.

The information you are receiving today can help you with all but the most resistant slackers, whether they are going through a slump, suffering a depressing situation, or just seem really lazy in general

Lighting the fire under the slacker.

Isn’t that what we all want to do? Don’t we secretly want to give every person who is slacking “the boot”? Whether that means firing them from our lives or lifting their backside three feet in the air with our unending pressure on them.

I know I certainly have felt this way.

And though there are so many different variables, situations and people types out there to weigh and measure, in the end, I find that this one question seems to bring all inactivity on their part to the forefront of the conversation.

In my personal opinion, this has proven to be the most effective way to get the slacker to wake up, own it, and get it in gear.

Here’s the Question:

“So, Slacker,”(uh…no..don’t call them that, no matter how much you’d love to. Just insert their name).

Uh hem. Let’s try again.

“Okay Mr. Lazy-pants-don’t-give-a- flip …” (oops…sorry. As you can see, I’m agitated, like you, even thinking about their nonsense).

“So, Sam, you’ve been saying you’d take out the trash since noon today. I do realize that you have quite a lot on your plate. There are three episodes left for you to watch of your favorite movie. There’s a fried chicken and a two liter of coke you haven’t killed yet, and your best friend is still waiting for you to come over and play pool with him. It doesn’t look like you’ll be able to take the trash out today and that’s fine.”

Nah, just kidding, but I do feel better after thinking it anyway.

Gee, I’m really struggling with “the nudge”, and sarcasm comes so easily in these “try to be tactful” sessions

Sheesh.

Okay.

ONce More.

“Sam, you told me this morning that you would take out the trash as soon as you got a round to it. Here you go…”

Then you hand him one of these

il_fullxfull-908091976_36nm

That’s all it takes!

Now, what do you do if you are in a situation where the other person is, for instance, your boss. And they have been saying that you could have a day off real soon?

Well, one of the things that I have found to be effective, 100% of the time, is to appeal to their fairness.

“Good morning Mr. Wilson. How are you today?”

“Just fine, just fine, Johnson. What’s on your mind?”

“Well, Mr. Wilson, you’ve been promising me a Thursday off for 6 weeks now. I think I’ve been pretty patient and I was just wondering what you think is a fair amount of time to keep me waiting”

Whew! Was that bold or what? But I swear it works.

You just need to remember to save this for one of those “over-the-top, they already know they’re being unreasonable” types of situations (though it may work in a milder situation too).

Anyway, just remember to be respectful. Try it and let me know how it works for you.

How to make a New Year’s Resolution that works

britney-spears-one-more-time-pencil-tapping-gifHow to make a New Year’s Resolution that works

The biggest problem with New Year’s resolutions is bait and switch.

 

I’ve been thinking a lot about New Year’s Resolutions lately and their astronomical failure rates.

I would like to share some of my insights with you.

One of the things I have noticed is the mis-defining of what a resolution is.

A new year’s resolution is not a daily resolve, but a year long resolve.

Here’s how to create a resolution that a has a hope in hades of surviving.

Think about planning a plan, rather than just a vague absolute.

So what exactly is a vague absolute? Is that just an oxymoron?

Nope. See, most goals are really vague (like “be happy”) AND absolute

As in “be happy every day”.

A better “resolution” would be “Find out what makes me happy, and then GO for it”

After you do the first part, give yourself a week to plan out HOW to do it.

For example: this year, I want to be happy. I want to find out what makes me happy. And then, I want to do, every day, what it takes to make me happy.

The biggest problem with New Year’s resolutions is bait and switch.

Let me explain. A resolution is just something that you resolve.

The only thing you need to do to have a resolution is just an inward resolve that you are going to do something.

A New Year’s resolution is just something that you resolve to do in the New Year.

And a year is a long  time to achieve that.

Resolve what you would like to accomplish this year.

Resolving that you want to do push-ups every day for a year is not a good resolution.

That’s an “everyday resolution”, not a goal for the new year as a whole.

Yes, you can do push-ups every day, but that’s not your new years resolution… your new years resolution should be your “why”. Why do you want to do push-ups? To get a flat belly. That’s your new years’ resolution: to get a flat belly.

Remember, a New Year’s resolution is just something you resolve to achieve this year.

As long as your belly gets flat, you have met your new years resolution.

Breaking that resolution down into Quarterly, monthly goals, etc., comes after the resolution.

Remember, you’re not resolving to do push ups each day. You’re resolving to get a flat belly this year.

Why do we set ourselves up for failure each year? It’s because we mistake a resolution with a daily goal.

Very few people who get a flat belly do pushups every single day without fail. That’s because life happens.

When we mistake a resolution for a goal, we quit the first time we hit a hard day. Oh. I missed pushups today. I “broke” my New Year’s resolution.

No you didn’t. You can still be “resolved”, as in determined, to achieve that goal.

Remember, a New Year’s resolution is just something you resolve to achieve this year.

Write down what you have resolved to accomplish BY THE END OF THE YEAR.

Break that down into Seasonal goals. For example, take that waistline measurement and subtract what measurement you want your waist to be, from that. If you have, for example, a forty inch waist, but you think you can make it 32 inches, do the math; you need to get from 40 inches to 32 by December 31st.

So, decide how many inches or centimeters you need to loose each month, and develop an action plan.

Now, you need to know that just because you don’t meet your goal the first month, doesn’t mean that you won’t reach your year in goal. When I first started doing push ups, I could only do three. By the third day, I could do eight. By the end of the week, I was doing 20. At months end, I could do fifty.

See, sometimes your goals will wax and wane in spurts. Daily goals shouldn’t be something you beat yourself up over, because A. they are not good indicators of your chance of success and B. they are not resolutions. You need over-all goals AND daily goals to help you get there.

Remember…you aren’t a failure if you miss a day or two (or three  or four. Or even a whole month learning this stuff). You are only a failure if you stop trying to reach your YEARLY resolution.

Keep the end in mind and the daily goals will happen.

“Feel good everyday! Check out our free downloads here

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Deep into 2017, how are those New Year’s Resolutions hopping?

Well, the half-way point of the 2017 has come and gone.

Have you given up on your New Year’s Resolution? It’s not too late:

The biggest problem with New Year’s resolutions is “bait and switch”.
Let me explain: a resolution is just something that you resolve to accomplish.

The only thing you need to do in order to have a resolution is just an inward resolve that you are going to do something.

A New Year’s resolution is just something that you resolve to do in the New Year.
And a year is a long time to achieve that.

It’s only the middle of the year, you guys. It’s not too late.
Resolve what you would like to accomplish this year.

Remember, it’s your resolution for this year, and the year is not over. Half of it’s still left!

Before we go there, let’s examine the quality of your New Year’s resolution.
In fact, before we do that, let’s define weather or not you even made a real resolution to begin with.

Here’s one example:

Resolving that you want to do push-ups every day for a year is not a good resolution.
That’s an “everyday resolution”, not a goal for the New Year as a whole.
Yes, you can do push-ups every day, but that’s not your New Year’s resolution… your New Year’s resolution should be your “why”.
Why do you want to do push-ups? To tone your upper body. That’s your New Years’ resolution: to tone your arms and “get fit”–or “fitter”.

As long as your upper body is toned and firm, you have met your New Year’s resolution.
Breaking that resolution down into Quarterly, monthly goals, etc., comes after the resolution.

Remember, you’re not resolving to do push-ups each day (or sit-ups, or whatever) You’re resolving to get a firm, fit upper bod this year.

Why do we set ourselves up for failure each year? It’s because we mistake a resolution with a daily goal.
Very few people who get a firmer upper body do pushups every single day without fail. That’s because life happens.

When we mistake a resolution for a goal, we quit the first time we hit a hard day. Oh. I missed pushups today. I “broke” my New Year’s resolution.
No you didn’t. You can still be “resolved”, as in determined, to achieve that goal.
Remember, a New Year’s resolution is just something you resolve to achieve this year.

Write down what you are resolved to accomplish BY THE END OF THE YEAR.

Break that down into Seasonal goals. For example, take an arm measurement and subtract it from what measurement you want your arms to be;
alright so now you know how many inches you need to put on (or take off) by Spring, Summer, Fall, until you have reached your goal.
So, decide how many inches or centimeters you need to add or increase each month (depending upon whether your are losing inches or building muscles), and develop an action plan.

Be sure your plan is realistic

If someone else shared with you the same plan that you have, would you think it was unreasonable? Be fair with yourself. A year is a long time, but it may not be enough time for your goal, so plan accordingly
Think about planning a plan, rather than just a vague absolute.
So what exactly is a “vague absolute”? Is that just an oxymoron?
Nope. See, most goals are really vague (like “be happy”) and absolute
As in “be happy every day”.

A better “resolution” would be “Find out what makes me happy, and then GO for it!”
After you do the first part, give yourself a week to plan out HOW to do it.
For example: this year, I want to be happy. I want to find out what makes me happy. And then, I want to do, every day, what it takes to make me happy.

Now, you need to know that just because you don’t meet your goal the first month, doesn’t mean that you won’t reach your goal by December 31st. When I first started doing push-ups, I could only do three (pathetic, I know…) But by the third day, I could do eight. By the end of the week, I was doing 20. At months end, I could do fifty.
See, sometimes your goals will wax and wane in spurts. Daily goals shouldn’t be something you beat yourself up over, because
A. they are not good indicators of your chance of success and B. they are not resolutions. You need over-all goals AND daily goals to help you get there.

Remember…you aren’t a failure if you miss a day or two (or three or four. Or even a whole month learning this stuff). You are only a failure if you stop trying to reach your YEARLY resolution.
Keep the end in mind and the daily goals will happen.

P.S. I just want to add, if your goal is to lose weight, you definately need all of the support that you can get. Weight loss is TOUGH! And, it takes TIME to lose tons of pounds. More about this in my next post

How’s Your New Year’s Resolution coming along?

How to make a New Year’s Resolution that works

The biggest problem with New Year’s resolutions is bait and switch.

Well, it’s been a few week’s since the majority of us made our New Year’s resolution

This is about the time of year that everyone sort of hangs there head and says, “Well, you know what they say…” (shrug) resolutions are made to be broken.

Wouldn’t it be nice to scream a resounding “NO!” the next time your best friend asks you “So, have you broken your New Year’s resolutions yet?

I’ve been thinking a lot about New Year’s Resolutions lately and their astronomical failure rates.

I would like to share some of my insights with you.

One of the things I have noticed is the mis-defining of what a resolution is.

A new year’s resolution is not a daily resolve, but a year long resolve.

Here’s how to create a resolution that a has a hope in hades of surviving.

Think about planning a plan, rather than just a vague absolute.

So what exactly is a vague absolute? Is that just an oxymoron?

Nope. See, most goals are really vague (like “be happy”) AND absolute

As in “be happy every day”.

A better “resolution” would be “Find out what makes me happy, and then GO for it”

After you do the first part, give yourself a week to plan out HOW to do it.

For example: this year, I want to be happy. I want to find out what makes me happy. And then, I want to do, every day, what it takes to make me happy.

The biggest problem with New Year’s resolutions is bait and switch.

Let me explain. A resolution is just something that you resolve.

The only thing you need to do to have a resolution is just an inward resolve that you are going to do something.

A New Year’s resolution is just something that you resolve to do in the New Year.

And a year is a long  time to achieve that.

Resolve what you would like to accomplish this year.

Resolving that you want to do push-ups every day for a year is not a good resolution.

That’s an “everyday resolution”, not a goal for the new year as a whole.

Yes, you can do push-ups every day, but that’s not your new years resolution… your new years resolution should be your “why”. Why do you want to do push-ups? To get a flat belly. That’s your new years’ resolution: to get a flat belly.

Remember, a New Year’s resolution is just something you resolve to achieve this year.

As long as your belly gets flat, you have met your new years resolution.

Breaking that resolution down into Quarterly, monthly goals, etc., comes after the resolution.

Remember, you’re not resolving to do push ups each day. You’re resolving to get a flat belly this year.

Why do we set ourselves up for failure each year? It’s because we mistake a resolution with a daily goal.

Very few people who get a flat belly do pushups every single day without fail. That’s because life happens.

When we mistake a resolution for a goal, we quit the first time we hit a hard day. Oh. I missed pushups today. I “broke” my New Year’s resolution.

No you didn’t. You can still be “resolved”, as in determined, to achieve that goal.

Remember, a New Year’s resolution is just something you resolve to achieve this year.

Write down what you have resolved to accomplish BY THE END OF THE YEAR.

Break that down into Seasonal goals. For example, take that waistline measurement and subtract what measurement you want your waist to be, from that. If you have, for example, a forty inch waist, but you think you can make it 32 inches, do the math; you need to get from 40 inches to 32 by December 31st.

So, decide how many inches or centimeters you need to loose each month, and develop an action plan.

Now, you need to know that just because you don’t meet your goal the first month, doesn’t mean that you won’t reach your year in goal. When I first started doing push ups, I could only do three. By the third day, I could do eight. By the end of the week, I was doing 20. At months end, I could do fifty.

See, sometimes your goals will wax and wane in spurts. Daily goals shouldn’t be something you beat yourself up over, because A. they are not good indicators of your chance of success and B. they are not resolutions. You need over-all goals AND daily goals to help you get there.

Remember…you aren’t a failure if you miss a day or two (or three  or four. Or even a whole month learning this stuff). You are only a failure if you stop trying to reach your YEARLY resolution.

Keep the end in mind and the daily goals will happen.

“Feel good everyday! Check out our free downloads here

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